CS-12v2 12" Combination Square (English)

A good combination square functions as a square, miter square, depth gage, and a marking gage making it an indispensable reference in workshops the world around.

In 2010, we introduced the CS-12v2 Combination Square – a radical redesign of the iconic combination square originally invented by Laroy S. Starrett in 1877.

Milled from stainless steel plate stock, the body of the CS-12v2 Combination Square is sure to inspire your best work—and those of your heirs—for generations to come.

Two sculpted legs separated by a black web, this is one gorgeous tool that you will never want to loan to your pesky, cheap neighbor.

We lengthened both legs from their traditional design roots. The 45 degree leg is significantly longer to improve registration with your stock. This precision milled square head is equally at home with the 12”, and 18”/450mm blade.

Each square is individually calibrated to be within .002” (.05mm) of 90 degrees measured at the end of a fully extended 18” (450mm)blade. The 12" Imperial blades feature left-to-right and right-to-left reading 32nds and 16ths. These blades are similar to our current CS-6/DSS-6 blades because you can flip the square over and view the same scale on the same edge. These blades have the industry standard layout with similar scales on opposite edges.

All graduations are chemically etched and black filled against a satin chrome plated background—they are easy to read and you should have no difficulties with clarity.

We have approximately 300 blades remaining from the 2010 run and are milling stainless steel heads to match.

Customer Reviews

Read Reviews | Write a review
" Can I use a Kerfmaker as a Tenonmaker as well? I'd like to use one tool for both dado cuts and tenons?

No. The Kerfmaker and the Tenonmaker have opposite functions.

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The Kerfmaker subtracts one kerf width to create a cut that exactly matches the thickness of the stock, as gaged by the Kerfmaker, to be inserted into the dado or groove created by using the Kerfmaker as a flip stop.

-

The Tenonmaker adds one kerf width to an existing mortise or groove, as gaged by the Tenonmaker, to create a tenon that fits the exact width of the mortise or slot created by using the Tenonmaker as a flip stop.

-

Why can I not get the correct width of the cut?

Prior to starting, close the Kerfmaker jaws and make sure they close all the way. Next, the orange jaw needs to be calibrated to the exact kerf . Prior to calibration the tool needs to be closed and locked. The two cuts create a small block and when placed back into the corner of the parent stock, the offsets are the EXACT thickness of your saws kerf. Make sure the orange lock wheel is locked tight. The gauge jaws are completely closed. Once this “one time” calibration is done, the tool is ready for use. You will never have to adjust it again unless you change the blade on your saw.

Next, loosen the gray lock wheel and gauge the the thickness of the stock you want created, a groove or dado. Keep in mind, if you want a slip fit, make sure the KM-1 mimics the slip fit. If you want a tight fit, make sure the KM-1 does not fall off when turned upside down. This tool will mimic EXACTLY the fit you choose.

Here’s how the KM-1 works, the calibration process is actually subtracting one kerf from your gauged material. When used as a flip stop, you can’t get anything but perfect results.

Visit the Bridge City YouTube page and look at the KM-1 videos. Here’s one we produced: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQ6_S6lZKLI

"

This item is no longer in production and is not available for purchase. It is listed here for reference purposes only. The last known published price is listed below.

Regular price $299.00

A good combination square functions as a square, miter square, depth gage, and a marking gage making it an indispensable reference in workshops the world around.

In 2010, we introduced the CS-12v2 Combination Square – a radical redesign of the iconic combination square originally invented by Laroy S. Starrett in 1877.

Milled from stainless steel plate stock, the body of the CS-12v2 Combination Square is sure to inspire your best work—and those of your heirs—for generations to come.

Two sculpted legs separated by a black web, this is one gorgeous tool that you will never want to loan to your pesky, cheap neighbor.

We lengthened both legs from their traditional design roots. The 45 degree leg is significantly longer to improve registration with your stock. This precision milled square head is equally at home with the 12”, and 18”/450mm blade.

Each square is individually calibrated to be within .002” (.05mm) of 90 degrees measured at the end of a fully extended 18” (450mm)blade. The 12" Imperial blades feature left-to-right and right-to-left reading 32nds and 16ths. These blades are similar to our current CS-6/DSS-6 blades because you can flip the square over and view the same scale on the same edge. These blades have the industry standard layout with similar scales on opposite edges.

All graduations are chemically etched and black filled against a satin chrome plated background—they are easy to read and you should have no difficulties with clarity.

We have approximately 300 blades remaining from the 2010 run and are milling stainless steel heads to match.

Customer Reviews

Read Reviews | Write a review
" Can I use a Kerfmaker as a Tenonmaker as well? I'd like to use one tool for both dado cuts and tenons?

No. The Kerfmaker and the Tenonmaker have opposite functions.

-

The Kerfmaker subtracts one kerf width to create a cut that exactly matches the thickness of the stock, as gaged by the Kerfmaker, to be inserted into the dado or groove created by using the Kerfmaker as a flip stop.

-

The Tenonmaker adds one kerf width to an existing mortise or groove, as gaged by the Tenonmaker, to create a tenon that fits the exact width of the mortise or slot created by using the Tenonmaker as a flip stop.

-

Why can I not get the correct width of the cut?

Prior to starting, close the Kerfmaker jaws and make sure they close all the way. Next, the orange jaw needs to be calibrated to the exact kerf . Prior to calibration the tool needs to be closed and locked. The two cuts create a small block and when placed back into the corner of the parent stock, the offsets are the EXACT thickness of your saws kerf. Make sure the orange lock wheel is locked tight. The gauge jaws are completely closed. Once this “one time” calibration is done, the tool is ready for use. You will never have to adjust it again unless you change the blade on your saw.

Next, loosen the gray lock wheel and gauge the the thickness of the stock you want created, a groove or dado. Keep in mind, if you want a slip fit, make sure the KM-1 mimics the slip fit. If you want a tight fit, make sure the KM-1 does not fall off when turned upside down. This tool will mimic EXACTLY the fit you choose.

Here’s how the KM-1 works, the calibration process is actually subtracting one kerf from your gauged material. When used as a flip stop, you can’t get anything but perfect results.

Visit the Bridge City YouTube page and look at the KM-1 videos. Here’s one we produced: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQ6_S6lZKLI

"